Living vicariously!

18 thoughts on “Living vicariously!”

  1. Could you give a brief explanation of allotments. I have several raised beds in a local community garden and there is a shared shed (with a lock) where we can keep tools. But this sounds like quite a large plot if there are fruit trees. What a treasure to have good soil to work with.

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    1. Allotments were designed for people who live without a garden to grow vegetables for their family (enough for the whole year) they tend to be quite large so they can feed a family of four. They all have different rules but usually state only a small percentage of the plot can be ‘non-productive’ (ie not veg) some say no trees. Usually only a very small rent per year (£20) You inherit whatever is here – junk weeds trees and all. Traditionally, measured in rods (1rod=16.5feet) 10 rods or the size of a tennis court to grow food. There is no way the new one I have is that big – maybe a third/quarter that size

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      1. Thanks for the explanation. Allotments are big! My beds at our community garden are 4′ x 14′. I have two beds and four more raised beds at home. Plenty for two people. We pay $5 US a year.

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      2. That is very affordable – there was outrage in one suburb here when they tried to raise the price to £150 per year. The initial thought behind them were to able to be affordable for the poor (to feed themselves)

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      1. Yes, different rules for each community but usually get a warning and a deadline if left unkept but unfortunately they are not enforced. I read one man got a warning every three months for long grass and he would mow and then wait for the next warning. Ad nauseam

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      2. I totally relate to the lax enforcement. I was supposed to be the enforcer at our community garden and even with repeated warnings about seeding weeds which would migrate to other people’s beds, it was often hard to get people to be good members of the community. I used the spray the paths between the beds (very carefully) with Round-up. Last year we said we wouldn’t do it but people would have to make sure the paths around their beds were weed free. Some abided by the rules and some didn’t and no one took responsibility for the common areas around the compost bins and the tool shed. Frustrating. So by the end of the summer I was back to spraying every couple of weeks. Our garden is right next to the library and the town owns the property. We need to keep the garden maintained or they might not renew our lease.

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      3. That is very annoying – I guess people need to be kicked out but where do you draw the line if those people might not have any outside space at all if they get kicked out. However, someone else that is more respectful might be missing out because of them so it is hard to know what is right

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  2. The allotment thing doesn’t really happen much in Australia although in some suburbs there are community gardens. I always like to look upon allotments from trains when travelling overseas and to see how people keep them, and lots of them are so beautifully maintained. It will be very interesting to see progress in ‘yours’!

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    1. Yes, the one next to ours is very neat. I wasn’t there for long today but I will tour and look at others. I have some spare pallets so we might put in some raised beds etc and neaten things up. Pruning and tying things back will improve it greatly to start off with

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    2. I guess that is because there is so much room and people usually have a choice if they want to live in a flat. In other countries people don’t have a choice of a garden space so if they want an outside area to enjoy they must wait for an allotment or go to the park.

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