Six on Saturday: fruits and flowers

27 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: fruits and flowers”

  1. You make a very good point re: kale. Home-grown allows us to grow a much wider range of veg too – there was something in the news about how we need maximum variety in our diet for optimum gut health. I think peonies are notoriously difficult to grow from seed, which is why they are expensive. But if anyone can, you can!

    Like

  2. Nice dahlia! About corn, wait a bit … I had the same problem because the male and female flowers didn’t arrive at the same time but it was successful. Otherwise, this year I mainly have female flowers on squashes, pickles, courgettes, … I don’t know why. I will look for reasons this weekend

    Like

  3. The hydrangea is a gorgeous strong colour and I hope it stays that way for you. I laughed about your buying plants rule.. who can possibly stick to that? I grew corn once and it was really successful. I think if you put the plants close together you get pollination. Yours look as though they’re developing cobs to me.

    Like

    1. Corn need quite a bit of heat so they might not grow as well here. You are supposed to plant in a close block instead of rows – I did that but I only have six so it is hard to make a block.

      Like

  4. I just came in from cutting kale. So delicious when it is young. You have the same Silestone quartz countertop that I have in my kitchen. Ten years later I’m still trying to decide on a backsplash. And I have had the same problem some years with lots of male flowers on my squash and no female flowers. I’m looking forward to hearing from others if there is a solution.

    Like

    1. Ha! I don’t think our counter is that fancy. Top of the line IKEA is all. I am just going to pick the courgette and hope for the best – I saw one male flower but it won’t open in time for the current females. Oh well, still plenty of weather left for more to grow

      Like

      1. Maybe your countertop came from Ikea but it looks exactly like the man made quartz Silestone that I paid a bundle for. I have a small kitchen so could do that, but if we remodel, I will check Ikea. LOL

        Like

  5. I hope you don’t mind me saying but I think your hydrangea’s are a bit too close to the fence, they will get a lot bigger and need more space I’m afraid. It is not a problem to dig them up now and replant them further from the fence, you just have to water them well.

    Like

    1. I think you are right – I have a tendency to do that as they look good at the time. I might move them before they truly grow into the soil (Your blog is not linked to your name so this comment when to spam. Only rivofa.wordpress.com)

      Like

      1. Ok, I have had problems with wordpress over the years, my blog at the moment (gwenniesgardenworld) is already the 3rd blog I started here as I can no longer add to the 2 others (gwenniesgarden and gwenniesworld) but I can still see them on here. I’m not so good in computering I must add ! 😀

        Like

  6. So much going on in your garden! The males always appear late in my cucurbits — takes some patience, but hope they arrive for you! I have no business attempting to grow corn here in the Pacific Northwest, but I do, and it is usually a flop. Yours look good!

    Like

    1. The males appeared first and then the female – both for a while but then now only female which is only slightly less than useless. At least they are more edible than the males. I thought if you have some warm weather you can grow them anywhere – is your season too short?

      Like

  7. All female cucumbers produce fruit without being pollinated, presumably with no seeds in them. Presumably courgettes are the same. You can get only male flowers early in the year when temps and light levels are low, maybe you get all females when it’s too hot?

    Like

    1. Hmm I am not sure about this – the unpollinated ones on the courgette never grow and eventually fall off – that’s why some people hand pollinate inside greenhouses where there are no insects. There are some cucumber types that have been bred for female only flowers that grow full fruit but not all cucumbers are like that.
      Perhaps you are right though about the temperatures; unfortunately though they never grow into edible size fruit without the pollination.

      Like

  8. As I said, I also have a lot of female flowers and no males … Maybe because of the hot weather as Jim presumed. I tried brushing female flowers on each other on my 2 plants but also with pickles flowers near them and it works: Since May 19, I can see 8 small cucumbers that will arrive soon , thanks to this technique ( Maybe because they are F1 plants??…)

    Like

    1. You pollinated female flowers with other females? Yeah, I think there are some F1 cucumbers that grow only female flowers presumably pollinate each other (they are the ones they say to pick off male flowers for better taste) The open pollinated plants need male and female I guess like in the wild. My courgette is F1 but I don’t think bred the same as a cucumbers are sadly.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes female with female… it’s weird but I didn’t want to lose all my female flowers so I tried to brush them. Last year I had male flowers but always less than female.

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s